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help in the coming days. >> in germany, a surprise announcement at deutsche telekom as the chief executive says he will step down at the end of next year. >> he has struggled with structural problems at telecom since taking over in 2006. the firm has faced challenges to its foreign business entities as well. the shrinking demand in germany for its land line services. the chief financial officer will take over at the beginning of 2014. well, european markets closed little changed on thursday, but slightly to the upside at new 19-month highs. our correspondent said as the summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the end of the era was a surprise to traders in frankfurt but did not worry them because his successors were known at the financial markets. it looks like a well-organized change. shares were up, but for dutch bank, the problems are getting worse. the towers have been searched again, and yesterday, the bank was convicted in milan. the shares have been lower. the german dax took a little break from its christmas -- christmas rally and closed barely unchanged. families s
germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem
to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89, and before that worked in the state department as assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs and 83-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and eminent involvement of these issues but and finally last but not least, ambassador matlock, known to many of us, career ambassador, he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all, since 1981, 91, excuse me. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991, a special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time, but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin
my wife and daughter in germany. i miss you, love you and will see you soon.it comes we understand. milies fa, at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking
the soviet troupes out of eastern europe. going to let nato take over germany. unite germany and nato can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kinds of things are in the air. what does bush do? tianimen square happens, he suspended relations, but behind the scenes does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in,
? >> chuck hagel was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix. he said i want to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist, and after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has bled for his country, unlike his critics. he understand war, unlike his critics. he did not have other priorities, like richard cheney, and never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill cohen put it best. he has fought and bled for this country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about shock hegel and some of the things he had to say about them. >> he was a supporter of the war in iraq. he supported the war in afghanistan. he voted in favor. it is an odd dove. all the critics are now decrying that he supported these wars. now when it came time to redeem what is it pay losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since the vietnam war, but it was a su
japan and germany. for one bay area 6-year-old christmas was still a magical time. one that even 60 years later he still remembered fondly. ktvu's george watson first brought us this report in december 2001. >> reporter: christmas will always be what you make of it and if seen through the eyes of a child even if the shadow of war it'll be a memory worth cherishing. mcgee's christmas of 1941 was preserved on home movies but he probably would have remembered it any way, after all he was only 6 years old. >> i remember i wanted crossing gating. because for my birthday my aunt gave me a railroad set and i had everything expect the crossing gates. i must have played with them for days. >> reporter: toys and christmas memories abounded for a 6-year- old boy. today almost all the toys are gone, but the christmas memories are still as vivid as they were almost 60 years ago today. >> trains were still very much a part of daily life in the bay area in 1941. and at christmas time they brought mike mcgee's peninsula home closer to the ground zero of christmas shopping, downtown san francisco. >
to germany. he was at fort d, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. they made him talk to the chaplain and pchologist. after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he has fought for his countntry unlike his critics. he has bled for his country unlike his critics. hehe understands war, unlike hisis critics. he does not have other incentives like dick cheney. he is prepared and r ready. bill cohen said it best. he has fought and bled for thisis country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national securitydvisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about huck hagel. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor, and supported the war in afghanistan. it is an odd de that supported the two were that all the critics are now crying. he also, when it camtime to dean what was a losing war in iraq with the surge, he not only opopposed it he said it would be the worst disaster since the vinam war, and it was actually a success. >> he has other problems thate will have to address. references that heade to gays, he will have to talk about the reference to the j
was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist and after two weeks, went to vietnam. he has fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has but pours countries, unlike his critics. he understands war, unlike his critics. he does not have other priorities, as richard cheney did at the same time in vietnam. he never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill, and put it best. he has fought for his country and but for his country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> two words, iraq and have -- iran. that is what upsets people about chuck a calamity had to say about those two. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor and supported the war in afghanistan and is an odd dove that supported the two wars and all the critics are now decrying. he also, when it came time to redeem what was a losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since t
to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before h
of germany from '85 to '89 and before that worked as a state department as assistant secretary of state for european and can nad yain affairs. and before that was the drecker of political military affairs in the department of state. so he along with his colleagues has a long and imminent involvement in the issues. and finally, left side but not least, ambassador mat lock known to many of us retired foreign service officer. he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all since '91. during the 35 years in the foreign service he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1978 to 1991 as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior directer for european and sowf yet affairs on the national security staff from '83 to '86. as ambassador of czech from '81 to '83. i won't go over the imminent and long career in the interest of time. i wanted to give you a brief recap for all three of them. of course, marvin, who is the edward r murrow professor at harvard kennedy school of government, and contributing news analysts for npr and fox
" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stuningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like america too. >> politics dem nie
times for medical evacuation to a field hospital, getting them to germany to the hospital at lamb stool and bringing them on to the united states as soon as they have stabilized has led to .. many of these young men, and they are mostly young men, a few women, but mostly young men, surviving wounds that would have surely killed them in any prior war, even ten or fifteen years ago, and i remember the first time i but at walter reed and i went, met with the first quadruple amputee, he lost both legs and both arms, and all he wanted was to drive a car again. and i saw him again, maybe six months later, with pro they tick arms and legs, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and p
to watch things in europe. the big day is the september 11th elections in germany and germany could be harder after the election. in the first half is the sent ceiling discussion and finally profits, personal income and production, if those can do better than the markets can lift but right now the view is for a nothing market from here till year end. once the seasonal increases go away, we could have tax increases rand spending cuts if we get a deal. why is that going on a headwind for the stock market? >> i think it will be. if the taxes go up, i think that's something that hurts consumer confidence. you've seen the retail sales in the last part of this season here, have sold off, and many people have said it's because of the fiscal cliff. >> kind of depressing when you say it's a nothing market between now and the end of 2013. how do you make money, if you want to see it's going to be a -- >> he knows rhyme going to say buy apple. it's up 20%, up 50% and some off a little bit. if it sells off, you'll have nice dividend stocks like ant anti--sizer, the subplatform of all of the sma
people in germany. they would demand huge sums of money so that ships could pass. you have 800 people holding them hostage. they are screwing up the supply chain. food is going to be involved pretty soon. this is what the seiu did on thanksgiving weekend. she said she could have cared less. that is fair. the union this union of 800 people has found themselves in a corner of the economy wherever i one says just solve the problem. you have the customers of the ports and the city saying fix this. when it comes to the president in this economy. we are 8 days in and he hasn't started the process of reconvening the board. >> the board is already so pro union as is the president fresh off his re-election even though this is not going to be a california emergency, this could be a national emergency for closing down those huge ports. that is it for tonight's show. thank you for watching. we will see you tomorrow night we need premarket capitalism. not a union hold up. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at
to the united states and my daughter and her husband. we met in germany and i saw this little girl and i knew immediately marie was going to be our grand daughter. i had no doubt about it i you hear about a match made in heaven. this was made in heaven. >> christmas time, and tell me what you are hoping happens for you this christmas? >> this christmas, i think i am really looked forward to putting up our nativity scene that my great grandfather maid. >> yes, sir he did. >> sounds like a wonderful family tradition. you i think it is interesting you didn't say you wanted for yourself but doing something as a family and honoring christ on his birth. it is obvious that the family that you have been placed into and chosen you is a very fram fam. senator, i just want to ask you, tell us why adoption is so important and would you encourage other families to consider the process? >> there are hundreds of thousands of young families around the country here in america that want to adopt. they know how . it -- difficult it is. we have a website and we help them out in the adoption process and caucus. w
. it was the same with east germany and west germany, the collapse of warsaw and the soviet empire. it was economic issues. i think the same today with the palestinians. it is impossible to be a non- democratic country if you have real gdp per capita of $10,000. you cannot explain what is democracy to a country like yemen with gdp per capita less than $1,000. half the population is completely illiterate and you have two hundred tribes. explain to them who is full terror and a jean-jacques terror and a jean-jacques rousseau and what is the great
a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part about this whole conversation. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an opinion about it. we have to make sure we don't disrespect our constitution amendment rights. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. times have changed since then. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should be rules in place on background checks. background checks, absolutely. but i think it's important that we respect our constitution because our country is founded on these freedoms. >> i don't want anyone to think that i'm anti-american. our country is founded on these freedoms. i totally respect the constitution, by the way. what i don't respect is what i don't respect i
only industrial country that came out of second world war intact. europe was on its knees. germany and japan were rubble so we thought that was the natural order of things. it wasn't. and when the other industrial countries recovered we got world competition as we have. we ran into bankruptcies. chrysler now twice. we see that in the southern states where the transplants are without the unions. they weren't the ones who went bankrupt last -- in 2008 and 2009. so it really is a choice. it's a tough choice. and i sympathize with the unions but the fact is that in the global economy where you have to compete on wages and other elements, of the units of production, can you either have, you know, high wages with low employment or you can, as obama would say, spread around the wealth. the fact is that in the right-to-work states, unemployment is 6.9%. >> we have a graphic that shows right-to-work vs. non-right to work statements on employment, go ahead. >> and in the other stays the non-right-to-work it's 8.7. so you can choose to have fewer workers who enjoy higher inflated unnatural, i
were going back to the united states and my daughter and her husband, we met in germany. and i saw this little girl and i knew immediately when i saw her, marie was going to be our granddaughter, you i had no doubt about it and it's one of these things that it's just, you know, you hear about a match made in heaven, well, this was made in heaven. >> all right, marie, i've got to ask you, it's christmas time. tell me what you're hoping happens for you this christmas. >> this christmas, i think i'm really looking forward to putting up our nativity scene that my great grandfather made. >> he actually made it. >> yes, sir, he did. sounds like a wonderful tradition. and it's interesting, when i asked what you wanted for christmas you didn't say something yourself, but something with the family and honoring christ on his birth. it's obvious that the family that you've been placed into and that has chosen you is a very special family. senator, i just want to ask you, tell us about why adoption is so important and would you encourage other families to consider the process? >> yeah, you kno
is it that germany, a country that has 1/4 of the population of the united states, exports more than what the united states does? because if you look at our tax code, that's broken, it needs reform, industries in the united states that are employing americans are given two-year tax credits and we expect those american companies to make generational commitments on a two-year tax credit. you look at places like germany, they're providing 10-year tax credits that sends a signal, a signal of certainty, a signal of clarity to businesses in germany, that there is a commitment to embrace innovation and technology, to remain competitive in the manufacturing economy. manufacturing today is not labor-intensive. it's capital-intensive. you always have to be in a continuous improvement mode. but that requires one thing. it requires a confidence in the american people, a confidence in the american worker, in making the kind of commitments that are necessary to compete with china. i often hear people on this floor, every day, whining about china. yeah, china cheats on their currency. they treat their workers poor
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.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. >> bill: stossel matters segment, as we have reported, it is likely congress will try ban assault weapons in the usa. >> the assault weapon is developed for military purposes, to kill in close combat. and it doesn't belong in the streets of our cities. and it doesn't belong where it can be picked up easily by a grievance killer who can walk in to a workplace, a mall, a theater and now an elementary school and kill large numbers. >> bill: here now, libertarian, john
's coat. happy new year, from germany. >>> now let's check in with randi kaye, who's in for anderson cooper with a look ahead at what's on "a.c. 360". >> we're keeping 'em honest ton the program. a 360 follow on a story that stunned all of us. people who are trying to capitalize on the tragedy of newtown. this woman has been arrested, accused of lying to federal agents. you'll hear some of the things she sent out on her e-mails, playing on people's kindness, trying to get money. s and also, late word that president obama will meet with congressional leaders tomorrow. keeping 'em honest, with both sides caught in a trap of their own making? we'll go live to the white house and capitol hill for the latest. and take a look at this, a tornado from the storm system that created holiday havoc across the country and it's not over yet. those stories plus the top ridiculist of 2012. it's all at the top of the hour, john. zp >> thank you, randi. we'll be watching. appreciate it. >>> our fifth story, outfront tonight, the viral political videos of 2012. now, there was no shortage of partisan no
. treated for being overweight and another issue for this back just this year in germany. but his health right now, not good. the outlook not particularly good right now, erin. >> thanks very much to nic. and next, trying to help any way they can, a ray of hope here in newtown. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. hurry in for a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. but since i've been on alli, am i on this one? nope. am i on this one? no, no, no, no, no. i am on this one. [ male announcer ] for every 2 pounds you lose through diet and exercise alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. simple. effective. belt-friendly. let's fight fat with alli. have a healthier holiday at letsfightholidayfat.com. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... w
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, but it's not from germany. a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> well, movie producers trying to get their film an oscar nod better kick their pr efforts into high gear. nomination ballot are tuchdu due january 3rd. grae drake is here to make some predictions and so everybody has been talking about "argo" but there could be some sort of surprises, come out of nowhere movies. what's going on? >> this is the time of year where hollywood is all abuzz, and you can sit in a restaurant and hear something whispering about the new movie that's going to get a nomination. i think first and foremost, most of these movies aren't out yet for people to see, but keep a close eye out. starting with "the impossible." this is a movie starring naomi watts and ewan mcgregor. a family, a true story. they went to thailand two days before the tsunami, and the movie is aptly titled because it's impossible not to lose your mind crying during it. the filmm
instantly. all the police in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- host: what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting periods? what about tightening those laws? guest: i think they will be on the table. there is probably a loophole in the system. on the concealed carry issu
, her son raymond was killed in the korean war while a third son served in west germany in the same war. no mother should have to lose two sons to war. but her family's sacrifice will forever be part of history and i ask that we pass this bill with no reservation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield such time as he may consume to my distinguished colleague from the state of michigan, mr. benishek. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize. mr. benishek: i come to the floor today to urge my colleagues to support my legislation, h.r. 4378, a bill to name the post office building in munising, michigan, after the late mrs. elizabeth kinnunen. her story is that like many across this nation, she came to america as an immigrant to to have a better life. she came to the united states in 1903 and married oscar in 1909. they had seven children and worked hard all their life to ensure their children would have a shot at the american dream. t
the kind of transition you had in germany? today germany is to lay prosperous country. will south korea consider the north koreans to be their cousins and brothers? there is a huge disparity at this point. you can see the physical difference because of the questions of nutrition and the way they are raised. is a total state based on fear. the challenge is to figure out how to absorb water looking like two or three lost generations. host: foreign policy in review with eli lake. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independen ts. you can send us the tweet or e- mail, f twitter.com/cspanwj, journal@c-span.org. john kerry for secretary of state and chuck cale for secretary of defense -- chuck hayes cogel. how will these nominations go/ guest: chuck hagel has not been nominated yet. john kerry was announced by the white house on friday. the fact that kerry was announced does not bode well for the trial balloon of chalk .eguck hagel we have seen john mccain say they are going to vote for him. chuck hagel has been questioned by a nu
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
them. laws in the u.s. don't apply to a hacking group in germany, for example. >> talk about the bigger issue. cyber security in general, because as you know leon panetta said earlier this year the next pearl harbor might be through cyber warfare. >> yeah. >> is this something that at this point people recognize? is the problem getting worse or better? >> the potential for a major strike, this pearl harbor idea he's put out there, that is not hyperbole. this could be the most efficient ay for those who want to strike our government and society or any other because it doesn't require the physical manifestations of previous terrorism where you have to go disrupt infrastructure take over aircraft do physical destruction. you can stay in your own country, reach out for almost no cost, and deploy software that can bring down utilities, hospitals. worst of all, it could squirrel financial markets. i don't think anything is a higher risk than the ability of going after financial markets and subtly causing problems not turning out the lights on the nyse but jus
the promise of the strategy, which has been used in germany, of the national manufacturing innovation hubs. that is something we will to promote in a second term and expand further. >> over here. >> thank you. every child matters. i applaud you for your comments about the need not to have less having money for children versus money for research and other vital needs in the domestic discretionary budget. the question is, where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers and stock transactions or other kinds of innovative -- carbon taxes, other kinds of approaches where we can find new revenue that it would be possible for us to have amongst ourselves for important resources? >> it is going to shock you to know that i'm not here to make news on a new revenues. [laughter] we are busy fighting right now to make sure that we have a budget agreement that is very balanced, and part of that balance is having enough high income revenues together with smart entitlement savings. that is the balance that people talk about the most. the other balances to make sure that you
for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with an applebaum in germany.soviet eastern m -- anne applebaum. that is a big night at 8:00 on c-span "q&a." >> now, latino leaders discuss issues that may impact of latino generation. panelists include former white house advisor to latin -- latin america, executive director of the latino partnership for conservative principles, and arizona state university professor rodolfo espinoza. this event is two hours. >> good morning. we will go ahead and get started. welcome to the wilson center. this is, as you well know, a place where public policy and a research me to bring together the world of ideas with your world a policy action. very happy to have our director of the latin-american program. and of course, very pleased that this is an event we are co- sponsoring with immigration works that did most of the work for this. the president of emigration works really put the panel together, as well as very proud to co-concert arizona university. i want to acknowledge a senior scholar at the woodrow wilson center. and many other good friends her
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can because it is in the negative equity and arguably they'll get nothing as we go through the motions further down the line. it lost another 25% of what is left of the market capitalization today. a number of the other spanish banks are also in negative territory and some of the spanish big industrials are also down today. under performance on madrid. just got to mention where we are on the greek banks. they are now going through a position where the central bank is saying we think they need 27, 28 billion euros. the questio
with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works,
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